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Nanny’s Notes

Issue 9, July 15, 2000
Summer Health and Safety

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CONTENTS
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Advertisement
The Nursing Mom's News
News
Health: Heat Stress Hard on Exercising Children
Tips and Tidbits
Health: Tips for Keeping Healthy in Public Water Areas
Neat Idea: More Things to Do With Your Grandchild
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Toys from Whimsicality
Resources
For Parents-Web Site: Summer Safety Sites
For Children-Web Site: Bicycle Safety Tips for Kids
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Nursing Mom's News

The Nursing Mom's News
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NEWS
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Heat Stress Hard on Exercising Children Exercising children do not adopt to temperature extremes as effectively as adults do, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement released in July. This may effect their well-being, their performance, and increase their risk for heat-related illness such as heat exhaustion or fatal heat stroke. (Climatic Heat Stress and the Exercising Child and Adolescent in Pediatrics Volume 106, Number 01 July 2000, pp 158-159 )

Exercising children can dissipate heat effectively at lower temperatures, but when the air temperature is greater than 95 degrees F (35 degrees C) their exercise tolerance begins to drop. The higher the air temperature, the greater the effect on the child; humidity must also be considered, as it is sometimes even more important than air temperature.

When the climate becomes warmer, either because of a move to a new location or because of a sudden change in the weather, exercising persons must take time to become acclimatized. Children take longer than adults to adjust to the higher temperatures and may need as many as 8 to 10 exposures of 30 to 45 minutes each to adjust. These exposures should be taken one per day or one every other day.

It's important to make sure that children drink enough while exercising, as they often do not feel the need to drink and may become dehydrated. Dehydration can lead to a large increase in core body temperature, making the children even more at risk for heat-related illnesses. If children don't want to drink plain water, a flavored beverage may be offered.

The AAP recommends:
1. The intensity of activities that last 15 minutes or more should be reduced when solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidly are above critical levels. The article has a table with specific recommendations.
2. When first starting a strenuous exercise program or after traveling to a warmer climate, exercise should be both less intense and of a shorter duration than usual. Intensity and duration can be slowly increased over 10 to 14 days.
3. Make sure children drink enough to be well-hydrated before prolonged physical activity, They should also be made to drink periodically during the activity, even if they do not feel thirsty.
4. Clothing should be light-colored and light-weight and have just one absorbent layer. Sweat-covered clothes should be replaced with dry clothes.

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TIPS AND TIDBITS
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Tips for Keeping Healthy in Public Water Areas

Public swimming pools and other public water areas where people play are potential sources of waterborn disease. Waterparks, pools, hot tubs, spas, public ornamental or recreational fountains, lakes, rivers and oceans can all contain germs that can make you or your child sick.

A number of diseases can be contracted by playing or swimming in contaminated water, including skin and respiratory infections. However, one of the most common diseases is diarrhea, which is spread when germs from human or animal feces get into the water. Swallowing even small amounts of water with these germs can make you sick.

While chlorine does kill most germs, it doesn't kill them all. To be most effective, chlorine must be maintained at proper levels. Hot tubs and spas have high temperatures that may cause the chlorine to evaporate faster than normal; therefore, chlorine levels in these areas need to be checked more often than in cooler water.

Here are some of the things you can do to reduce the danger of waterborn disease. These tips apply to ALL kinds of public water areas, including public fountains where children play.

* Anyone with diarrhea should not go into the water. Minute amounts of fecal matter can be rinsed from a person's bottom as he moves through the water, contaminating it.

* Wash your child thoroughly, especially his bottom, before allowing him in the water.

* Swim diapers or swim pants are not leakproof-- don't rely on them.

* Change your child's diapers often. If you have an older child, make sure she takes frequent bathroom breaks.

* Change diapers in a bathroom and be sure to wash your child's bottom and your hands thoroughly with soap and water. Also wash thoroughly after going to the toilet yourself.

* Do not swallow the water.

* Don't let pool or fountain water splash or spray onto food or beverages.

* Don't sit on or over fountain jets. This can increase the risk of water contamination.

* Notify the pool attendant or lifeguard immediately if you see fecal matter in the pool. Also notify them if you see people changing diapers on tables or chairs, or in other areas where the water or eating areas could become contaminated.

* The safest pool is a well-managed pool, one that maintains proper chlorine levels at all times and that promotes healthy swimming tips to prevent contamination.

This information is compiled from
1. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Recreational Waterborne Disease
2. Invisible pool guests can cause kids to get sick
3.Outbreak of Gastroenteritis Associated With an Interactive Water Fountain at a Beachside Park --- Florida, 1999 .

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More Things to Do With Your Grandchild

Little Things Mean a Lot *Explore the natural world together. Examine ant hills, other insects. leaves and flowers with a magnifying glass. Go for walks and tell her the names of the plants and flowers you see. If you don't know the names, get a plant/flower identification book; the two of you can learn together!

*Have your grandchild pick 5 to 10 small objects for you to hide around the house. Once they're hidden, tell her what rooms they're in. Older children can be timed as they try to find them. If you have more than one grandchild, make a contest out of it.

*Cuddle up and read to your grandchild as often as possible. Buy or borrow from the library books that were his mom or dad's favorites, or books that you liked yourself as a child. (I've been reading to Olivia since she was a few months old and we usually read at least one book every time she comes to visit.)

*Keep a box or trunk filled with old clothes, hats, jewelry and other dress up items. You and your grandchild can go to rummage sales and second hand stores to find new treasures to keep in the box.

Expanded by my personal experience with ideas from the book Little Things Mean a Lot: Creating Happy Memories With Your Grandchildren by Susan Newman. For more information, or to buy the book, please click here.

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Please support this Nanny’s Notes Advertiser!

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http://whimsicality.com/

Whimsicality-Toys that bring out your child's imagination, Naturally. Quality wooden baby rattles, puzzles, games, toys. Soft bears, dolls, puppets, and toys. Stockmar art supplies, and much more for playtime fun!

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RESOURCES
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Summer Safety Sites
Here are a few sites that give information about various aspects of summer safety:

1.Summer Safety Guide from SAFE KIDS of Greater Orlando
http://www.ci.orlando.fl.us/departments/opd/safekid.html
This guide includes information on bike safety, lawn mowers, sun burns, and water safety.

2. National Bike Safety Network
http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/bike/default.htm
This site is an excellent resource for bike safety information. The sections include bicycle helmets, bike safety programs, references, publications, links to other bike sites, and more.

3. Summer Safety Information from Children's Hospital
http://www.discoveromaha.com/partners/childrens-summer.html.
Follow the arrows at the bottom of the page for information about bicycle, roller-skating, and skateboard safety

4. Thunderstorm Safety Fact Sheet
http://www.fema.gov/library/thunderf.htm
Learn how to prepare ahead of time for a storm emergency, and what to do when the storm hits.

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Bicycle Safety Tips for Kids

Florida Children's Safety Center
http://legal.firn.edu/kids/bicy_ans.html
This page is a list of tips for bicycle, rollerblade and skating safety. Use the front and back arrow keys at the bottom of the page to find safety tips on other topics.

Riding Bikes
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/RxFlyer/Rxflyer3.htmlKids
Another page of bike safety information..

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woman2woman Newsletter
http://www.VHPublishing.com/woman2woman

woman2woman Newsletter is a unique woman's health newsletter serving CO, TX and the entire planet, edited by a nurse-midwife. We offer a variety af topics, specializing in articles which empower women!

We will be announcing our new name soon. In the mean time subscribe to our FREE publication by emailing subscriptions@VHPublishing.com with name and email (or land address if no internet access). Cathy Hartt, CNM,Editor

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Copyright 2000 by Donna Zelzer, all rights reserved.
The individual writers hold copyright to the individual articles.
Copies may be freely distributed electronically, as long as
1. This permission and the authorship of the articles are retained in any
additional publication of the article.
2. The content of the article is not changed in any way.
3. You do not charge for the article, other than the cost of download
and/or connect time, or photocopying costs, in the case of a printed
version.
4. Subscription information is included

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Back to Nanny’s Place

Read the Archives
May 7, 2000: Sample
No. 1, May 20 ,2000: Lead Poisoning
No. 2, May 27, 2000: Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome
No.3, June 3, 2000
No. 4, June 10, 2000: Fire Safety
No. 5, June 17, 2000: Playground Safety
No. 6, June 24, 2000: Toy Safety
No. 7, July 1, 2000: Car Seat Safety
No. 8, July 8, 2000: Dangerous Substances in the Environment
No. 9, July 15, 2000: Summer Health and Safety
No. 10, July 22, 2000: Breastfeeding and Attachment Parenting
No. 11, July 29, 2000: Fun and Games
No. 12, Aug 5, 2000: Arts, Crafts, and Paper Fun
No. 13, Aug, 12 2000: Everyday Safety
The Rest of the Issues



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© 1999-2006 by Donna Zelzer. All rights reserved.

MoonLily Homespace holder Read Articles space holder Shop space holderNanny’s Placespace holder Online Birth Center space holderHerbs
The Chariotspace holder Spirit Speaksspace holder Magical Journeysspace holder Science and Science Fictionspace holder Free Stuff

Read the Archives
May 7, 2000: Sample
No. 1, May 20 ,2000: Lead Poisoning
No. 2, May 27, 2000: Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome
No.3, June 3, 2000
No. 4, June 10, 2000: Fire Safety
No. 5, June 17, 2000: Playground Safety
No. 6, June 24, 2000: Toy Safety
No. 7, July 1, 2000: Car Seat Safety
No. 8, July 8, 2000: Dangerous Substances in the Environment
No. 9, July 15, 2000: Summer Health and Safety
No. 10, July 22, 2000: Breastfeeding and Attachment Parenting
No. 11, July 29, 2000: Fun and Games
No. 12, Aug 5, 2000: Arts, Crafts, and Paper Fun
No. 13, Aug, 12 2000: Everyday Safety
The Rest of the Issues